*
Omagh Support And Self Help Group *
*
Banner
*
*
*
Home * Latest News * Events * Public Inquiry * Objectives * Gallery * Publications * Donate Online * Search Archives * Our Services * Contact Us * Links
*
*
Latest News *
*
2008 News    *
*
2007 News    *
*
2006 News    *
*
2005 News    *
*
*
* * *
*
*
Outcomes
*
Michael Gallagher (Omagh)
I went straight to the hospital and into the casualty area. There were hundreds of people there, many with head and facial injuries, the
hospital was total chaos. I walked down the corridor; there was a trolley there with a body on it which was covered in a sheet. There was
blood all over the floor. I went to every part of the hospital and operating theatres. I was so
scared as I did not know what to expect. I went back home to see if Aiden had come back, he was not there so I went back to hospital. On my
third visit to hospital, I found Aidens friend, he had been very badly burned and I asked him if he knew anything about Aiden. He said that he
remembered Aiden walking beside him and
did not see him after that..
*
*
*
catherina Gallagher-Wilkinson (Omagh)
I briefly spoke with Aiden before I headed in to town. He was in his bed sleeping off the night before, with jeans and shirt still on.

Later I was in our family kitchen when the bomb exploded. I ran up the stairs to my bedroom skylight window taking two steps at a time and watched
as a black puff of smoke encircled the town.

I was speechless, I could not believe what I was seeing. Dad had been and gone to the hospital and was waiting at the leisure centre for news. As the clock
ticked on, I heard the front door open. My mother was in the hall with her eyes fixated in the direction of the front door. Daddy walked down to meet her and without and word,
opened his arms and cradled her tightly. His face was pale and tear stained. Griping each other, they wept like children
*
*
*
Alistair Wilson (Derry/Londonderry)
I was celebrating my birthday on the 26th and another friend of ours, Bobby, was just prior to that so we decided that on the 26th, on my
birthday, we would have a joint birthday party just going to a upstairs room in the local pub -
for our generation, that was a big thing. It meant you were growing up.

That lunchtime I had been with Bobby. He said he was going to call over to the Waterside for us. I said Do not be silly we will come over and get
you at the Fountain, because the pub was nearer him. He insisted he would come over so I said ok then left saying I would see him later.

The next time I saw Bobby was in his coffin with the track of his murderers foot on his face and thats how he went to his grave
*
*
Chrissie McAnee (Derry/Londonderry)
We sold our furniture and were ready to move on. My husband had his last interview for emigrating to Australia in 1969, by then the troubles had started. At the end of the interview in London, the interviewer asked
why was he running away from his home and it was then and there he decided to stay.

We lived in constant fear of CS gas attacks it was a nightmare. We had one room where I stored a bucket of vinegar and water, and kept a supply of towels to protect the children if
there was a gas attack. I suppose I lived in robot mode, I had to accept that this is the way it was going to be and this was how we lived.
*
*
Dorothy Boyle (Omagh)
My husband Raymond spent 22 years in UDR. He went into bad areas, where there were constant bomb scares. Because we never knew if he would come back this was a very stressful time for both me and my son.

He lost two of his friends in the troubles, one of them was shot at the side of the road, he was taken from the Mineral Lorry he was driving,
another friend committed suicide.

All the houses shook during the big Omagh bomb. We went up the street and it was just a complete bloodbath, there were bodies everywhere, and the blood was washing down the street. I was so afraid that my brother was
caught up in it but thankfully he was not.
*
*
Kay Gallagher (Omagh)
My husbands brother Hugh was murdered
during a taxi run. He was shot in his car. We got the phone call in the middle of the night.

One of the children in our family was having their First Holy Communion the next day and Hugh was supposed to be there acting as a sponsor to the child.

We had to tell the children as they grew up what had happened their Uncle Hugh, we could not tell very much because he was a Catholic in the UDR and thats why he was shot, we had to keep things quiet, even though
he was completely innocent and had joined up to make extra money. He was young and gullible and he ended up dead.
*
*
Fiona Crawford (Omagh)
I was out walking my dog, I was 19 yrs old at the time, when a car with two young men in it blew the horn at me - that was normal in those days. Ten minutes later, we heard a gunshot
and knew something had happened. Half an hour later we found out that a close family member had been shot dead. He was only twenty at the time. I was posting my wedding invitations that day to him and his girlfriend -
she was doing her nursing studies but failed the exams due to the stress.

My husband had to move away as there were threats to his life. After he received a head injury, things changed dramatically for him and recalling the events of the past was hard.

There was not much help over the years.
*
*
Kathleen Tracey (Derry/Londonderry)
It was a Wednesday night. I was at home with the children, my husband had gone down to Annies Bar where he met up with my brother Charlie. They were sitting in the bar having a few pints. He got up to go to the toilet when he
heard a tapping sound and people running in to the toilet shouting theres a shooting in the bar. He ran out to the bar, Charlie was on the
floor - he was already dead.

My neighbour came to the house to tell me that Charlie had been shot and was sure that he was dead. My mother was in the sitting room, I did not know how to tell her, after six to seven
months my husband was still in shock and I had to get the doctor to him one night, he just could not accept Charlies death.
*
*
Madeline McCully (Derry/Londonderry)
From her poem

Outside my Door

You asked for secrets, well I have one, I saw the Major fall I heard the shot and watched the blood run
down outside my door

The window glass and twenty feet of tarmac separated me from him
Yet I could smell his fear, raw terror, gasping breath, jerky rifle movements

Eyes darting everywhere yet always returning to my door
He waited, I waited, imprisoned and ashamed

No help came, one hour or was it two
Afraid of snipers bullets he peed his pants and I died a little

Still the blood trickled in the gutter outside my door
*
*
Margaret Melarkey (Derry/Londonderry)
I had six children: five boys and one girl. I did not allow them to get involved in anything, because I was afraid that they would be lifted. I
was afraid to let them go to Catholic housing estates in case they would not come home. They all grew up and did not get involved in any of the
troubles because I was very strict with them.

Two years ago my son, who had depression, hung himself. At his brothers wedding he was the best man - the life and soul of the party. At
the time I thought,
Thank God they are all settled. He used to get very down in the winter
time. I met my daughter to chat about it and we decided to go to see him. When we got to the house, he could not move, his head was in his hands. We called the nurse who came and
made an appointment for him to see the
psychiatrist. The next day he died
*
*
jacqui Woulfe (Omagh)
My parents had gone to Donegal for the
weekend. That night I went to a dance at a hotel with my boyfriend but I felt unwell at the dance and wanted to go home. Outside we noticed the Mazda taxi of Hughie. He was a member of the UDR. He said he could not give
me a lift home that night and that was the last time I saw him. Later at the front door I heard loud knocking, it was my two older brothers, Michael and Johnny, telling me that Hughie
had been shot dead

I could not cope and was sent to my older sister in Chicago where I kept my identity hidden for over twenty six years. I had to constantly
defend his honour, and explain over and over again his reasons for joining the UDR.
*
*
Rodney Elliott (Omagh)
In 1979 I joined the army; I was a junior soldier at age sixteen. We trained in Ballymena for two months then I was posted to Germany and eventually sent to the Falklands. After that, I had seen enough, so I came home to Omagh, where I met my wife. I joined the TA in 1982, and was a member of the 4th Battalion Royal Irish Rangers. At the cenotaph in 1987 in Enniskillen, we were marching up the street when the bomb exploded and literally blew me off my feet. We
immediately secured the weapons, and started digging people out of the rubble. I got stuck in, helping people. Twelve people died that day
and sixty three people were injured.
*
*
Sadie Livingstone (Omagh)
My brother Albert was murdered. The news was devastating for me. As I had two children at the time my friend took the children until the funeral was over


Two boys came in and shook my mothers
hand, I noticed they had blood on their
trousers, and realised it was them who had killed Albert. They pretended they did not know where it had happened. Albert had got into a car and because he had refused to do what they wanted him to do they shot him. Albert worked
in H & W in Belfast at the time and he had been off sick with a hand injury. He had passed the exams to join the police. It was very hard for my family to accept Alberts death. My best
friend Hazel then lost her daughter in the Omagh bomb
*
*
Stanley McCombe (Omagh)
On the 15th August 1998 my eldest son and I were in Scotland at a competition. The news had filtered through that there had been a
bomb in Omagh, but we did not know about injuries or deaths. Around 5pm we began getting information that there had been casualties. I heard that my sister who was a traffic warden had been killed in the bomb, but
although she had been injured was fortunately still alive. I went to Ayr and tried to make contact with my wife Ann but could not get through as the phone lines were either busy or
down. About 11pm we learned that Ann was dead.

It was unthinkable, what had happened. On the Monday morning I was able to go to the morgue with my brother-in-law. When I walked into the little room there was a body bag with the top slightly open. I could only see
Anns head.
*
*
Tommy McCully (Derry/Londonderry)
My mother had a long history of illness; she had a weak heart and rheumatic fever as a child. She was standing at the front door talking to a neighbour when a gun was accidently discharged by a soldier. The bullet
hit the wall behind her and some shrapnel went into her face. She was affected by a rapid deterioration of her health and less than a year
later she died. My father, who was sitting up with my mother hours before she died, died himself and they were buried together. It was a huge funeral which came to the attention of the
army.

My brother came home from London after
living there for sixteen years; he was living in the house on his own. One day he was arrested and jailed. The police offered no evidence and
eventually released him after a year in Crumlin Road jail.
*
*
Oonagh McCorkhill (Derry/Londonderry)
My husband took our children to school every day. On day there was a knock on door. A policewoman was standing there and told me he had been in an accident and that he had shot, but not critically, and that we needed to go to the hospital immediately. They
brought me to the hospital in the police land rover.
He was in terrible pain. He had been stopped and asked him his name. When he answered they shot him through the wrist and again in the top of his thigh. It was an awful time when
he was in hospital. I was getting phone calls to say
We are going to get you and your husband.
He was treated very badly in the garage where he worked. He had no enemies and no connections with any organisation and was only shot because he was only Protestant working in the garage
*
*
Helen Keogh (Derry/Londonderry)
Rosemount was a very friendly place to live. In our street we had both Protestant and Catholic. We all got on well together and were good
neighbours. My husband worked for the Peerless Dry Cleaners and they where told if they did any dry cleaning for the army the Peerless shops would be bombed.

I worked with a girl whose brother was shot on Bloody Sunday. He was a boxer and was supposed to box in Dublin on the Sunday - The only reason he was on the march was that he failed the medical so he could not go to Dublin.
Just the Friday before she was saying how the men of the army were someones husband, son or brother and they where only here because they were needed
*
*
Jeanette Warke (Derry/Londonderry)
We were put out of our home in Mountjoy
Street the friendliness and the community spirit and everybody sharing their dinners with you sharing the washing machine because you had not been lucky enough to have a
washing machine of your own. Running in and out of your neighbours houses, babysitting for each other, getting a lend of sugar and wee stupid things. Thats what we done you do not
get it back once you are put into a housing estate where you were not wanted in the first place. I will
never forget this woman, God rest her, shes dead now; a big, able bodied Protestant woman walking down the street the first day I was there, saying, Get back into the town,
you are all bloody trouble makers anyway, thats why you were threw out here.

Such a lot we lost, friendships, community and fun.
*
*
David Temple (Claudy)
My uncle came home from work, sat on the settee and said, There is one of you missing. Your brother Billy has been killed in the Claudy bomb. The house broke into crying. We were
in deep shock and we could not just understand.

He was sixteen at the time and worked in Co-Op, on the lorry. He was finished school and this was his first job, only in it a few months.
He did the milk run that morning filling in for somebody else. He escaped the first bomb by going through the car park - he escaped with
only a cut on his right hand but he walked into the second one down at the Beaufort Hotel.
Everybody called to our house - Protestant and Roman Catholic. We had great support from all the community and it was one of the biggest
funerals ever to take place in Donnaghmonery.
*
*
Margaret Young (Omagh)
It was the 3rd of May 1974. My husband went out on duty to the UDR camp called Deanery near the border at Clogher. As usual I was at home with my three young children like any
other night. When my husband did not come home I knew something was terribly wrong. I was to find out later in the early hours of the
morning that there had been a mortar attack and shooting at the camp. They told me that around forty one IRA men attacked the camp, which resulted in the first Greenfinch in that
area to be killed, and it traumatised the rest of the company. It had a lasting effect on us all as a family and I knew things would never be the
same again.
*
*
Stephen Mitchell (Omagh)
Around eighteen years ago when I was only about five years old my fathers car was highjacked outside the Ulster Bank in Gortin and a bomb was attached to it. The bomb squad was called and they detonated it which blew off the side of a wall. My father was in the
UDR at the time. Before the bomb he had
received several death threats from the IRA.
After that we had to be very vigilant which affected our family life. Things were never the same for us again after that when my father was out on duty we could never be sure he would be home again.

I feel that as a result of
the bomb our childhood was completely
neglected.
*
*
Angela (surname withheld) (Omagh)
I was not married to a British Soldier but a British citizen as my father denied us his permission to get married until we had saved up the money to buy him out of the army. But,
as that was way back in 1978, people still heard the English accent and did not see the person.
We could not go out to the pub or be seen in public. He got a very good job in town and earned good money. It was hard to get a flat as when they heard the English accent it was always the flat has just gone. Finally a kind
lady gave us a room. In the mean time, my mother was going through hell, she received a mass card with my name on it and her windows were smashed. After five months of married life, we left to go to England. That was the saddest day of my life.
*
*
Raymond & Hazel Cairns (Ballykelly)
We had been at a fundraising event in
Ballykelly. We went home with friends that evening, but our son Jonathan did not come home after us. We did not think anything unusual about this at the time, as he was a young lad out with his friends. We went to bed
and the next morning he had still not come home so we checked with his friends.

Later one of his friends was walking past the school when he noticed a jacket with blood on it and called the police. They found a plastic sheet covered in blood covering what they
thought was a dead sheep; they then
discovered Jonathans body and sealed off the area. We heard rumours that the neighbours had said the reason Jonathan was murdered was because our family were stuck up.
*
*
Hazel Dixon (Limavady)
I was out at the bin putting stuff in the bins and I thought There is the sirens, but we went on to bed. Later a friend of my sons came to the door and I heard them talking in a low voice
and I could hear what he was saying: he said Theres a bomb has gone off in the Dropping Well. I knew thats where Ruth was and I thought No, it could not be, she ran out or something.

You never think it could really
happen that she would be dead but anyway the stir started up and all night long they searched for her. My sons rang all the hospitals and we
sat praying and listening to the radio all night waiting to hear. The morning came and my son and his girlfriend went up to Altnagelvin and thats where they found her.
*
*
Charlotte Russell (Derry/Londonderry)
I went to spend the day with my mother-in law and father-in-law. We were sitting listening to the news at about five to four and on the news it was reported that there was a CSU
officer murdered in Londonderry. I just knew right away that that was Brian. I tried to ring Brians work but the line was always engaged.
We were just home a few minutes when the knock came to the door and this policeman was there. I said to him straight away, I know why you are here, because I know that Brians been
shot. At that instant I felt really sorry for the policeman at having to come and tell me this. He said Well if you would like to come to
Altnagelvin, we will take you to see how Brian is.
So my memory of Brian is him going to work and me saying Cheerio and that was twenty six years ago.
*
*
Kathleen Corrigan (Derry/Londonderry)
Creggan was predominately Catholic but we did have some Protestant neighbours. We were all friends and grew up together happily. I do not think we were poor, at least I know I
never wanted for anything. I went to a
grammar school which was quite unusual for a girl from a housing estate in the fifties. There was discrimination at the school, only it was not
recognised as that then, it was called
snobbishness.

Anyway I grew up and married a sailor in the Royal Navy which did not fill my parents with joy. The troubles were in their infancy and because we lived in a Ministry of Defence house we decided it was better if we moved out
sooner rather than later. I lived away from Derry during The Troubles and have no experience at first hand of anyone in my family having been killed or injured (at least physically).
*
*
Kathleen Corrigan (Derry/Londonderry)
Creggan was predominately Catholic but we did have some Protestant neighbours. We were all friends and grew up together happily. I do not think we were poor, at least I know I
never wanted for anything. I went to a
grammar school which was quite unusual for a girl from a housing estate in the fifties. There was discrimination at the school, only it was not
recognised as that then, it was called
snobbishness.

Anyway I grew up and married a sailor in the Royal Navy which did not fill my parents with joy. The troubles were in their infancy and because we lived in a Ministry of Defence house we decided it was better if we moved out
sooner rather than later. I lived away from Derry during The Troubles and have no experience at first hand of anyone in my family having been killed or injured (at least physically).
*
*
Kathleen Doherty (Derrry/Londonderry)
When the Civil Rights movement got under way I was a strong supporter and attended rallies and marches up until time the paramilitaries became involved. The first incident that made a real impression on me was Bloody Sunday, my cousins fiancee
worked in the Derry Journal Office and was a keen amateur photographer. My cousin came to our house that evening with the news that he had been killed. We just could not believe that
such a thing could happen. As we left her home that night and passed an army checkpoint I remember feeling very bitter towards the soldiers. When I went to work the following day I discovered that our young apprentice
mechanic who was only seventeen had also been shot dead. We were devastated as he had been at work on the previous Friday and going about his work as normal.
*
*
Jo Lynch (Derry/Londonderry)
Being away from home my first source of
information was through the media, and as we all know that was not always accurate, so I would phone home to my family, but the conversation was strained, because the phone
lines were tapped, (you could hear the clicking on the line and you never got through first time). However you were only too glad to be told none of your family had come to any harm.

The most frightening thing was when the
terrorists started bringing their campaign to the British mainland, they had no regard for human life, they could have been killing their
own families, as there are a great number of Irish people living in Britain.
*
*
Annie Courtney (Derry/Londonerry)
I worked as a nurse at Altnagelvin Hospital, I was an operating theatre assistant, so during the troubles, we saw all of the victims when they initially came into the hospital. You
treated them, fixed them up but it was only in later life you realised how this was going to affect them for the rest of their lives. At the
time it did not register the trauma that these people were going to go through in the future years.

The strange thing is that hospital work and theatre work - we were trying to help people, anybody, that was our job. Sometimes there were people that you knew very well as we were all part of the same community, but you had to
get on with the job. It affected us all in different ways and the fact that we were local and knew some of the people gave it more potency for
us.
*
*
Bridie O Donnell (Derry/Londonderry)
I went to town one Saturday and when I came home there was not a window in the house and the car at the end of the road was wrecked with stones. One night we were in bed sleeping and
there was an awful bang - a bomb had been left at the front door. After that we decided we could not take a chance by staying, so we put the
house up for sale and nobody would buy the house because it was where it was. I was putting up the Christmas tree when my husband came in and said to me Bridie, there is a bit of shooting in Annies Bar tonight,
I said, Was Pat or Barney there? and he said, Just Barney, he was shot but do not worry because he walked into the ambulance. At the hospital two priests put their arms around me.
I said Do not tell me our Barney is dead! I still have his coat that he wore that night, the bullet hole is like a cigarette burn in the back of
his coat.
*
*
Lilly Rankin (Derry/Londonderry)
When the Troubles started, everyday I was running to the Long Tower School, with towels to put around the childrens faces. The people
that lived around the school were all putting vinegar on towels and bringing them out to protect the children going home from school and it was terrible on a Saturday when you used to go into the town you never had any money to buy anything but we used to go out
anyway and take a walk around the town and down the Strand Road.

You were always getting caught in the gas, especially up around William Street. I remember one time getting
caught and running, trying to get away from it and throwing the cover over the wains pram trying to keep it away from him, running like hell over to Foyle Street to get away from the
gas and trying to get home.
*
*
Mark Eakin (Claudy)
I had just sprayed Windolene on the shop window while my little sister Kathryn, aged eight, was standing waiting patiently for me to finish so she could carry out the very important
task of cleaning the window to please our dad.
This was our family business and Dad was so proud of what he had achieved over the years.
The next thing I remember was a huge bang. Turning around the first thing I saw was my wee sister Kathryn lying on the ground. I was in shock not knowing what had happened. The next thing my Dad came stumbling into the street covered in debris. He had been out in the yard where a wall had collapsed showering him with rubble. He was very lucky as I was myself as I only suffered visibly from minor cuts and
bruises. But a lot of pain , and grief was to follow
*
*
Kay Duddy (Derry / Londonderry)
But I try not to cry now because I cried for thirty eight years but that lie was carried on and carried on and it was what they said afterwards, I mean they desecrated his name
you know, and I mean that just added insult to injury. It was not enough that to shoot him down like a dog in the street; they had to go ahead then -to hide what they done. They told
lies and said he was a petrol bomber. And that lie was carried on and carried on and thats why it was always so frustrating and thats why,
to be honest, that I felt that a lot of people always said, Aw here we go again: Bloody Sunday and Bloody Sunday that
*
*
Margaret Brady (Derry / Londonderry)
During Operation Motorman my father
went down to the shops with my brother - but Daniel was cold so he decided to come up to the house for a coat, but he met his cousin Thomas and he took him on up to Creggan Heights to get him a coat; he had to meet my
mammy anyway. So Thomas and Christopher; the other cousin were walking over Creggan Heights and when they seen the army coming down the Watery Lane they decided to come
home and they crossed over the street and the soldiers just opened up on them for no reason and the only reason my father went out that morning was to see if he could help if there was
people hurt and to see what was going on. He was never a violent man - he did not believe in violence and the morning that Daniel was shot my mother asked the priest to get a mass
offered for the soldier, she said he needed it more than Daniel.
*
*
Pauline McLoughlin (Derry / Londonderry)
I went to Thornhill College and I got a wee job down in Brendan Duddys in Beechwood. I was still at school but I worked the weekends and all. I remember I worked with a woman from
Creggan. She was older than me; that was her full time job. She used to have a visit from her boyfriend who was a policeman. Now I grew up
in the Creggan and I never saw a policeman from morning to night - we never needed a policeman - but because she was going with a policeman and he wanted her to get married and he wanted her to go to Australia; Father
Carlin, the priest went up to her house and told her mother for her to finish with him simply because he was a Protestant. So, you grew up
like that there too. The church helped and wanted you to stay segregated too.
*
*
Gloria Miller (Claudy)
From her poem

The Days are Gone

The days are gone, when through the fields we wandered
With father, mother, husband, friend and son
Or listened to the voices of our children
At work or play, so innocent each one.
But they will live within our hearts forever
Their memory we will ever hold so dear
Oh how we miss the friendship of a brother
Or watch a daughter grow in tender years,
A wife that's sadly missed by all her children
A sister's voice that some no more will hear.
But though the years have passed, and we have grown older
With us, our loved ones still remain the same
*
*
Peggy Hamilton (Douglas Bridge)
It was 11.45 and I was working at my frame at my workstation when I suddenly felt the sensation of a hand on my right shoulder and heard a voice say, Come with me to Londonderry. I froze where I was and began to
feel nauseated and switched off my frame to compose myself. As lunch was almost due I waited until it was over to turn my machine back on. I had no sooner done so when my manager came and placed his hand on my shoulder and asked me to come to the office.
When I asked him why I had to go with him and what he matter was, he only said he would talk in the office. When I reached it I saw my husband, one of my daughters and two sons who also worked at the mill along with two of
my daughters-in-law, and it was then my
husband told me Roy was dead.
*
*
Margaret Parkhill (Derry / Londonderry)
It was while he lay dying on the street that his eldest brother found him, but because of his disability he could not lift his younger brother
off the ground. Bobby was taken to Altnagelvin Hospital where he died from his wounds with many friends and family around him.

I remember when we were leaving the house on the day of his funeral our father called us all together and said to us, Hold your heads up high when we walk out and do not let them see
that they have hurt us. I would rather have a son who was murdered than have a son who is a murderer.
*
*
Joan Baggley (Derry / Londonderry)
At ten minutes to one in the morning there was a knock at the front door and there were two policemen standing there. It was only when they told me that Bill was dead that the whole thing hit me and after that I do not
remember much but I do remember Linda
standing in the hallway in her pyjamas and, looking back, I think it was after she heard what she did that she decided to join the police herself.

Just like her father before her, Linda was buried with full police honours after a service in her parish church. She was laid to rest with her father having been shot just yards from
where he himself had been murdered. People said to me that the worst thing that could happen was to lose a child and I know what they mean.
*
*
Victor Barker Buncrana (Guildford, Surrey)
I remember as I got in the foyer of the hotel there was a Sunday newspaper with a picture on the front of James on a stretcher and it said,
Victim of the Omagh Bomb. I had just got hold of the paper when my mates came down the stairs and they asked me if James was ok. I said, Look what they have done to my boy and I
broke down.

Eventually I get a phone call from the guy who had taken the picture, and he came to meet me on the bridge. He got out of his car and he was apologetic, but he also insisted that when the photograph was taken James was
alive. It turned out he had not died on the side of the road like some of the others had they had found him, they had taken him to the hospital, but he had been left there for an hour
and a half, he was just lying there. They did not know how badly injured he was.
*
*
*
* * *
*
*
VIEW LARGE FORMAT
VIEW NORMAL FORMAT
* Omagh Support & Self Help Group - Omagh Victims Group
Bridge Centre| 5A Holmview Avenue | Omagh | Co. Tyrone | BT79 0AQ
Tel: 028 8225 9877 | Fax: 028 8225 9877
Registered charity number:NI100554
Button: Facebook Btn *